When .22 splits aren’t fast enough……..

Recently, I was evaluating a HK VP9 that was done up by Grayguns, Inc.  I was shooting string after string on the timer.  I noticed that somewhere south of .22 splits on multi-shot strings, my accuracy fell apart.  I dismissed the VP9 as being inferior, due to the stock box P320 Carry giving me nice little piles of bullet holes at .16-.18 splits. Continue reading

NEW- Hornady “American Gunner” line of ammunition

Hornady is expanding their ammunition offerings in 2015.  One of the products will be the new “American Gunner” line.  I recently came into a couple of boxes of the stuff from another gun writer who was in one of my classes.  (Thanks Tom!) Continue reading

LOUIS AWERBUCK REMEMBERED

1948-2014
Warrior, Artist, Philosopher

  Who wouldn’t want to be remembered with words like these:

Stubborn, single-minded, articulate, knowledgeable, independent, moral, inquisitive, interesting and accomplished .   .  .

That’s what Robbie Barrkman wrote of Louis Awerbuck (his friend of 35 years) on his Robar Guns website, after Awerbuck’s death in June 2014.  (The entirety of the heartfelt tribute is HERE).   Awerbuck’s Yavapai Firearms Academy, with a summary of his resume, is HERE.  A 2008 interview of Awerbuck, where he answers well-posed questions on life, death, and equipment, is HERE.  Another one, rather well-known, “Interview With A Madman,” is HERE.  An interesting commentary on his death, evidencing Awerbuck’s appreciation for warrior history and philosophy, “Requiem For A Soldier,” is HERE.  It is said that he was fearless, but carried a high capacity 1911 as a primary, and a Glock 19 as backup. Continue reading

Guest Editorial: Jeff Gonzales on Strength and Shooting

*We are very pleased to feature a guest article written by our good friend, Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts. Jeff is an experienced trainer, avid shooter, and long time friend of mine and Tim’s, and we are very excited to have him here. To learn more about training with Trident Concepts, please visit www.tridentconcepts.com - Hilton

Jeff demonstrates a strength training drill on the range, pulling a weight attached to a length of rope.

Want to get better at shooting? Great, I have two words for you….weight room! Continue reading

Mindset & The Determined Adversary: An LE Training Perspective

As a career LEO and trainer, current events caused me to ponder how we should approach training for our profession. If you are in LE and reading MSW, chances are that you have already pondered what we will be discussing here, but despite our best efforts and hopeful wishes, not everyone in our profession has likely come to grips with all of the reality of dealing with the threats we now face.  Continue reading

Cold Weather Training

Training at a Balmy 32 degrees.

For those of us who live in the “Less Temperate” areas of the country. Cold weather training is a reality if you want to keep your training relevant and current. In the Northeast we have approximately 6 months of cold weather and 6 months of not quite as cold weather. There are several differences in cold weather firearms carry and usage that need to be addressed in training.

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Controlling time?

Last weekend I was at the range with a party of different shooters and friends.  There were several kinds of props and targets and everyone was having a good time shooting.  The group consisted of some novice shooters and at one station there was a military guy with his “babe” of a girlfriend.  She had taken up a stock Glock and was trying to knock down plates on the plate rack.  Well…she was struggling.  She was jerking the trigger, throwing shots repeatedly to the left driving through the magazine.  At this point, her “stud” came over and told her the all knowing advice of “slow dow and get your hits!”  Duh!  Just slow down and get your hits.  Of course this did NOT go well.  Our heroine tried her heart out but only managed to miss slowwwwly. Continue reading

Training In 2015: Some Recommended Instructors

Kyle Lamb of Viking Tactics shoots a demo during his Street Fighter class.

As 2015 starts to get into full swing, some folks are probably putting some thought into their training plan for the year. In my previous post, I gave some suggestions for how to up your game with training in general. Today, let’s take a look at a list of some instructors with whom I have trained recently, and why I think you should go check them out. Continue reading

Happy New Year and New Year’s Resolutions

Happy New Year everyone! With 2014 behind us and the calendar back to one page, thoughts always drift to plans for the new year. The problem with the classic New Year’s resolution is that they tend not to be very long-lasting – think of all those wasted gym memberships, unread diet books, and unused exercise equipment. To maximize success, consider thinking in small realistic increments for your best results. Let’s take a look at a few resolution ideas that might fit for MSW readers. Continue reading

One Handed Shooting

How much do you shoot using one hand only?

The art of one handed shooting is just that….an art.  The benefits from learning to shoot with only one hand are pretty self evident.  There are lots of scenarios where we find ourselves potentially with only one hand available.  Those include injury to one hand, holding open doors, shielding loved ones, holding on to a lead for a K9 for those of us that are/were handlers at one time or another. Continue reading

“LESS-LETHAL” : EDC FOR THE ARMED?

TakeawaySimple answer: Yes, less-lethal (impact, aerosol chemical, conducted energy) should be considered as a possible EDC adjunct to being armed. If you choose to carry less-lethal, get initial and periodic refresher training from a professional credentialed for the particular type/brand less-lethal weapon. Be prepared to articulate what you chose to carry (likely OC) and why. Update your knowledge base at least yearly for usage studies and legal developments, and to consider any product improvement.  If you choose not to carry less-lethal, be prepared to articulate why not. Whichever way you go, expect that somebody, maybe someone whose opinion matters, will second guess you. Continue reading

Training Speed with Accuracy

Three pistol targets after some training of speed while still being accountable for accuracy. Photo courtesy of Shin Tanaka.

I was recently surprised by the insight of a Facebook post on the topic of balancing speed and accuracy in training. Not surprisingly, however, was that it came from my buddy, Shin Tanaka. A USPSA Limited Class Grand Master, gifted machinist, 1911 gunsmith, and contributor to Recoil Magazine, Shin is about as well rounded as they come. His post caught my attention as it quantifies a method of balancing your speed and accuracy when it comes to training. According to his post, using USPSA scoring zones, he uses the point system in USPSA to measure whether or not he is being too conservative or pushing his limits. So assuming 5 points for A zone, 4 points for BC zone, and 3 points for D, and 0 points for a no shoot or miss, Shin uses a percentage score to determine whether or not he is pushing his limits. 93-97% of max score is the goal. Above 97% means you need to push the speed harder, and 93% means you need to dial back the speed.

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Shooting On The Move, a Trainer’s Perspective

I was once asked by a student, “Why don’t we train to shoot on the move?” I replied, “We need people to be able to shoot while stationary before we can expect to combine moving and shooting.” That is an oversimplified overview, but hits the crux of the matter. Our previous article hit the basics of the ideas surrounding shooting and moving, and today I wanted to offer a counterpoint focused primarily on the training considerations. Continue reading

Shooting on the move or move then shoot?

To be or not to be, that is the question…or for us, it’s should I shoot on the move?

As a law enforcement trainer, I am routinely asked to incorporate shooting drills that have the officers shooting while moving.  In class, there are always students who push for that type of training especially in anything considered Advanced.  But what is shooting on the move? Continue reading

Slow is smooth and smooth is fast. Well, not quite.

One of the most overheard phrases in firearms training is the old adage of “slow is smooth and smooth is fast.” In my career as a trainer and shooter, I seem to recall it most often told to me by people who were slow and maybe smooth and honestly had little business telling me what actually was fast. Words have powerful meaning, and as an instructor, it is important for us to use the correct ones when trying to impart skills and knowledge to our students. Continue reading