Throwback Thursday Boots: Adidas GSG-9

Back in the 90′s, THE cool guy boot to have was the Adidas GSG-9. Lightweight with a soft lug sole and supple leather upper, it simply made you more tactical just wearing it. Adding to the mystique of the boot was that it was not readily available through commercial channels until the late 90′s, was extremely expensive due to being imported from Europe, and was the only sneaker style assault boot on the market at the time. Continue reading

MADE IN THE USA : THE TEK-LOK™ (U.S. PATENT 6,145,169, NOVEMBER 14, 2000)

                  

It’s true. The well-known holster and magazine pouch attachment device shown above was designed by two knife guys.  If you are into knives, you likely recognize the names Tim Wegner and Robert (Bob) Terzuola.  If you ever spent serious time at a national knife show (BLADE, Knifemakers Guild) you might have met and even chatted up one or both. It is indeed the very same Tim Wegner who is a co-founder of this very well-known maker of carry, duty, and competition holsters and accessories  —

        

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Revolver Relevance

Ruger GP100 Wiley Clapp.

 

In today’s modern age, the polymer framed high-capacity pistol is what you will most likely find in the holsters of law enforcement officers and concealed weapon permit holders. Does this mean that the medium framed double action revolver is obsolete?  Is the revolver still relevant?  Can it meet the needs of the self-defense shooter if he or she is capable? Having carried a wheelgun as a duty weapon in a previous life I believe it can.  The Close Quarters Pistol class put on by Hardwired Tactical Shooting (HiTS) seemed like the perfect venue to test my theory. Continue reading

Aimpoint Mounting Locations

Cantilever mounts allow Red Dot Optics to be mounted far enough forward so that a magnifier can be mounted with proper eye relief.

A few weeks ago, a reader emailed to ask for an article regarding preferred Aimpoint mounting locations on carbines. I have always done what just seemed right to me and had never put much thought into it. But apparently there was some method behind my madness, so here are my thoughts on the topic. Note that much of this is based on personal preference, so you may want to adjust to your needs.

The first point of consideration is whether I am mounting a full size Comp M68 or a Micro. The Micro is an excellent evolution of the sight and offers outstanding battery life, durability, in a lighter and more compact package than the M68. However, the viewing window is indeed smaller which, to me, changes some things as to how my eye picks up the dot when I mount the rifle.

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EDC: How much is too much?

As self reliant, safety minded citizens, MSW readers most likely make a habit of carrying more essential items on a daily basis than the average person on the street. However, it seems like the trend of Everyday Carry (EDC) items seems to grow regularly, and I got to wondering when it was too much. Continue reading

Glock 19 EDC Photo Of The Day

Custom Gen 3 Glock 19 EDC with MDFA Kydex Carry Gear

Given recent incidents involving Active Shooters and current threats we all face, I rethought my EDC weapon selection. While I enjoy the 1911 platform and shoot it well, the ammunition capacity and ability to mount a WML were lacking. Continue reading

One Handed Shooting

How much do you shoot using one hand only?

The art of one handed shooting is just that….an art.  The benefits from learning to shoot with only one hand are pretty self evident.  There are lots of scenarios where we find ourselves potentially with only one hand available.  Those include injury to one hand, holding open doors, shielding loved ones, holding on to a lead for a K9 for those of us that are/were handlers at one time or another. Continue reading

“LESS-LETHAL” : EDC FOR THE ARMED?

TakeawaySimple answer: Yes, less-lethal (impact, aerosol chemical, conducted energy) should be considered as a possible EDC adjunct to being armed. If you choose to carry less-lethal, get initial and periodic refresher training from a professional credentialed for the particular type/brand less-lethal weapon. Be prepared to articulate what you chose to carry (likely OC) and why. Update your knowledge base at least yearly for usage studies and legal developments, and to consider any product improvement.  If you choose not to carry less-lethal, be prepared to articulate why not. Whichever way you go, expect that somebody, maybe someone whose opinion matters, will second guess you. Continue reading

Review- Surefire SOCOM Muzzle Brake

So, I am a self admitted muzzle brake newb here.  I’ve only been fooling with them for about a year now, so I am most definitely the new guy on the block.  I’ve always been a fan of the A2 style flash hider, if for nothing else as to not be annoying to my fellow shooters as  there are brakes out there that are down right annoying. Continue reading

Training Speed with Accuracy

Three pistol targets after some training of speed while still being accountable for accuracy. Photo courtesy of Shin Tanaka.

I was recently surprised by the insight of a Facebook post on the topic of balancing speed and accuracy in training. Not surprisingly, however, was that it came from my buddy, Shin Tanaka. A USPSA Limited Class Grand Master, gifted machinist, 1911 gunsmith, and contributor to Recoil Magazine, Shin is about as well rounded as they come. His post caught my attention as it quantifies a method of balancing your speed and accuracy when it comes to training. According to his post, using USPSA scoring zones, he uses the point system in USPSA to measure whether or not he is being too conservative or pushing his limits. So assuming 5 points for A zone, 4 points for BC zone, and 3 points for D, and 0 points for a no shoot or miss, Shin uses a percentage score to determine whether or not he is pushing his limits. 93-97% of max score is the goal. Above 97% means you need to push the speed harder, and 93% means you need to dial back the speed.

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The Long Slide Glock in Service Use

This past week a good buddy and I discussed the merits of choosing a Glock 17 or 34 for LE special team use. The long slide Glock 34 (9mm) and 35 (.40), initially introduced as competition pistols, have gotten some traction as service pistols. The M&P 9L (now discontinued), M&P Pro, and Glock 41 (.45) are other long slide versions of existing service sized pistols which come to mind. Continue reading

The Beretta 92G is BACK!!!!!!!

Photo courtesy Wilson Combat.

Beretta is bringing back in my opinion the best Model 92 pistol they ever made………the 92G series.

In an announcement on their Facebook page on November 4, 2014, Beretta announced that they were bringing back a couple of “classic” 92 series pistols.  One of these pistols is the 92G.  The 92G is for all purposes the same reliable, accurate service pistol that the military M9 is.  With the major exception that the decocker/safety is a decocker only.  I find this very important and believe this is the gun that the military should have bought.  The major detractor of the “decocker/safety” is the ability to inadvertently put the weapon on safe anytime you manipulate the slide.  For those living in a cave who have not shot the Beretta, this can lead to turning the gun into a non-functioning paper weight.  I’ve seen shooters over the years, and in some cases experienced shooters, accidentally push the safety/decocker down, and then pull the trigger two or three times before they realize what they have done and fix it.  Some instructors/schools have come up with doctrine to train around the decocker safety to keep this from happening, but to me the 92G is a much better deal.  The decocker on the 92G is the same as on its M9/92FS sibling, it is just spring loaded to the fire position.

BUT WAIT, THERE IS MORE!!!!!  The picture above is credited to Wilson Combat’s website.  It is a collaboration between Wilson Combat and Beretta.  It is a special run of Beretta 92G Brigadier pistols.

For more information, check out Beretta and Wilson Combat.

Shooting On The Move, a Trainer’s Perspective

I was once asked by a student, “Why don’t we train to shoot on the move?” I replied, “We need people to be able to shoot while stationary before we can expect to combine moving and shooting.” That is an oversimplified overview, but hits the crux of the matter. Our previous article hit the basics of the ideas surrounding shooting and moving, and today I wanted to offer a counterpoint focused primarily on the training considerations. Continue reading

Shooting on the move or move then shoot?

To be or not to be, that is the question…or for us, it’s should I shoot on the move?

As a law enforcement trainer, I am routinely asked to incorporate shooting drills that have the officers shooting while moving.  In class, there are always students who push for that type of training especially in anything considered Advanced.  But what is shooting on the move? Continue reading