The Beretta 92G is BACK!!!!!!!

Photo courtesy Wilson Combat.

Beretta is bringing back in my opinion the best Model 92 pistol they ever made………the 92G series.

In an announcement on their Facebook page on November 4, 2014, Beretta announced that they were bringing back a couple of “classic” 92 series pistols.  One of these pistols is the 92G.  The 92G is for all purposes the same reliable, accurate service pistol that the military M9 is.  With the major exception that the decocker/safety is a decocker only.  I find this very important and believe this is the gun that the military should have bought.  The major detractor of the “decocker/safety” is the ability to inadvertently put the weapon on safe anytime you manipulate the slide.  For those living in a cave who have not shot the Beretta, this can lead to turning the gun into a non-functioning paper weight.  I’ve seen shooters over the years, and in some cases experienced shooters, accidentally push the safety/decocker down, and then pull the trigger two or three times before they realize what they have done and fix it.  Some instructors/schools have come up with doctrine to train around the decocker safety to keep this from happening, but to me the 92G is a much better deal.  The decocker on the 92G is the same as on its M9/92FS sibling, it is just spring loaded to the fire position.

BUT WAIT, THERE IS MORE!!!!!  The picture above is credited to Wilson Combat’s website.  It is a collaboration between Wilson Combat and Beretta.  It is a special run of Beretta 92G Brigadier pistols.

For more information, check out Beretta and Wilson Combat.

Shooting On The Move, a Trainer’s Perspective

I was once asked by a student, “Why don’t we train to shoot on the move?” I replied, “We need people to be able to shoot while stationary before we can expect to combine moving and shooting.” That is an oversimplified overview, but hits the crux of the matter. Our previous article hit the basics of the ideas surrounding shooting and moving, and today I wanted to offer a counterpoint focused primarily on the training considerations. Continue reading

Shooting on the move or move then shoot?

To be or not to be, that is the question…or for us, it’s should I shoot on the move?

As a law enforcement trainer, I am routinely asked to incorporate shooting drills that have the officers shooting while moving.  In class, there are always students who push for that type of training especially in anything considered Advanced.  But what is shooting on the move? Continue reading

1980′s Throwback for the 1911

In yesterday’s post, I promised to discuss the holster and magazine in the photograph. For starters, the knife was an easy one to ID – a classic Gerber Mark II in factory black finish. That knife is probably one of my favorite all time knives, though a dagger design with a smooth double guard handle is impractical for most applications. Continue reading

Back to the 80′s, 1911 Style

For last week’s Throwback Thursday post on my 10-8 Performance Instagram page,  I posted the above photo of a 1911 build I did back in 2001, along with a challenge to identify the holster rig, knife, and magazine. In a depressing turn of events which highlights a certain lack of attention span in social media, no one was able to ID the mag or holster. Let’s see if MSW readers can do any better. The answers will be featured in tomorrow’s article. Continue reading

Slow is smooth and smooth is fast. Well, not quite.

One of the most overheard phrases in firearms training is the old adage of “slow is smooth and smooth is fast.” In my career as a trainer and shooter, I seem to recall it most often told to me by people who were slow and maybe smooth and honestly had little business telling me what actually was fast. Words have powerful meaning, and as an instructor, it is important for us to use the correct ones when trying to impart skills and knowledge to our students. Continue reading

The 357SIG Cartridge

I purchased my first pistol chambered in 357SIG in late 1995 or early 1996.  It was a SIG Sauer P229.  I had purchased it after reading about the cartridge/gun combination in Velocity magazine.  I bought the gun and loved shooting it.  After a while, it became really expensive to feed, and it was traded for something else to which I don’t remember what.  Over the years, I have purchased guns chambered in 357SIG, kept them a while, and traded them off or sold them.  I have always been enamored with the cartridge, but the not the cost. Continue reading

Technical Competence

In my firearms training, I have always placed a high value on technical competence. This is not because I don’t recognize the importance of judgmental shooting training. The two go hand in hand. But technical skill and the confidence that results gives the officer or citizen precious time to make that critical decision under pressure. Confidence lowers stress levels and fosters better decision making. I truly believe that many officer involved shootings that have gone wrong were due to the officer panicking because they did not have confidence in their skillset. They felt that they were “behind the curve” and therefore had to react “faster”, which could result in a questionable shooting. Continue reading

A SHORT ESSAY : WINNING IS EVERYTHING . . . AND THE ONLY THING

From “No Second Place Winner” (© 1965), by William H. (“Bill”) Jordan (p.101):

“There is no second place winner in a gunfight!  That sage remark is of unrivaled importance to an enforcement officer. Nothing he can buy from a life insurance firm takes the place of his ability to shoot fast and accurately. Storebought insurance will make his wife a rich widow, but it will be someone else who helps her spend the settlement. Not too attractive a proposition from the masculine point of view. The kind of life insurance he can buy with competent gun handling ability is obviously much more practical.”    [You can read/download Jordan's book, HERE].

MSW posts urging weapon reliability and “get out and train” (whether specialized classes with the been there done everything hardcore trainers, shooting drills on the clock on your own, physical conditioning, and yes, competing) really speak to one thing, winning a life threatening encounter.  I wanted to write a post to put out my long-held lament on the subject.  It strikes me often: I see streets named after and plaques honoring LEOs killed by the gunfire of evildoers.  (I was casually acquainted with several of the deceased LEOs, and a bit more with a couple).  But I never see what would inspire and make me feel much better —  a street named after an LEO who WON a gunfight.  So here it is, to be filed under the CAN element (mindset) of my paradigm on deadly force. Continue reading

Distance, Sight Choices, and Some Random Thoughts.

Here of late, I have been involved with some interesting conversations on active shooter problem solving.  I will acknowledge up front that this thought process is somewhat flawed, and borderlines on the academic.  I will also acknowledge that I don’t have all the active shooter answers.  The answer I think we all can agree upon is the fact that good guys with guns is the answer to the active shooter/mass homicide problem. Continue reading

Skill Drill: Emergency Reloads

One of my responsibilities at the job that pays my bills is to write the monthly qualifications for our personnel. I am always trying to come up with suitably practical, challenging, and reasonable standards. My goal is always to challenge folks to improve their skillset without demoralizing or frustrating them, which is always a fine line. Continue reading

IRON SIGHT MYTHS, MISCONCEPTIONS, AND STUFF, PART 3: Fiber Optic Sights

In the interests of full disclaimer, I did hit this topic earlier this year in a post about the “fragile fiber optic front sight,” but this iron sight series seems to be a good place to stick all the ideas together under one mantle. It seems that I am constantly fielding the same questions about fiber optic sights, so let’s talk about some of the myths and misconceptions surrounding them. Continue reading