Revisiting the Glock Factory Extended Slide Stop

When I first started running the Gen 4 Glocks, I was fairly insistent that due to the shorter fore/aft size of the new frame, I no longer needed to use an extended slide stop with the guns. All of my Gen 3 Glocks sport some type of extended slide stop, but now with the slightly smaller Gen 4 frame I had found that my thumb was better able to reach the standard length slide stop. That all worked great until one day where I trained in the pouring rain…. Continue reading

REVIEW: Garrett Industries “Silent Thunder” OWB Holster

Having rekindled my love affair with the wheelgun, I found it necessary to procure a quality holster.  My usual, off the shelf, brand turned out to be a dismal failure.  Again, I turned to the Internet for answers.  While there were numerous high end options available for wheenguns, pricing and wait times were more than I was willing to endure.  I also saw Garrett Industries mentioned frequently in the same sentence as “fast”, “quality” and “customer service.”  I took a look at the website and saw the Silent Thunder OWB holster and felt it would be well suited to range and class duty.  The website listed a 7 business day turnaround time.  Seven business days later I had a shipping notice in my email and tracking information to show that the holster actually shipped, not just a label printed. Continue reading

In Search of the Perfect Pack: Vertx EDC Gamut

The Vertx EDC Gamut (shown here in Smoke Grey) is functional and fits into an urban setting without screaming “I’m tactical!”

For as long as I can remember I’ve had a sickness for backpacks. I’ve gone through the variety of tactical packs to include Eagle AIII packs in every conceivable color, the popular RAID pack, and countless other brands. One of my longtime favorites was the 5.11 COVRT 18 pack, which had quite a few well thought out features. Build quality wasn’t terrible, but it still left me wanting more. So when Vertx released their EDC Gamut pack, I had to have one. My first impressions after receiving the pack is that the build quality exceeds that of the 5.11 pack by a noticeable margin. It has a semi-flexible frame sheet that helps the pack stand and keeps its shape. Zippers glide smoothly (the 5.11 never had a problem in this regard) and materials are rugged where needed. So what about the design? Continue reading

Should I suppress for home defense?


Sorry folks, the park is closed….Moose out front should have told you“  John Candy-“National Lampoons Vacation”.

The words of John Candy’s character kind of sum up my advice on the most of the “should I do XYZ for my home defense gun”.  The fact is I only give advice on suppressors for home defense because there are thousands of variables.  I can’t say with any kind of authority what might be right for your situation.  Using suppressors doesn’t seem to be a one sized fits all.  Juries and prosecutors might view a suppressed rifle in a deadly force incident one way in one location, and another way some place else.  What I can do is give some things to think about, and the individual can decide for themselves based upon their situation and their needs. Continue reading

HK VP9, First Impressions

So I got an HK VP9 recently and got a chance to stare at it a bit, handle it, and get some impressions of it.  This new offering, essentially a striker fired P30, has been hotly anticipated as it is the first striker fired gun out of HK since they started the ball rolling in 1970 with the very first polymer striker fired gun, the VP70. Continue reading

THREATENING DEADLY FORCE : MUSINGS ON “BRANDISHING” AND “WARNING” SHOTS

I “learned” the following while browsing the internet:

  • In order to scare off a home intruder and alert neighbors to summon the police, one should go out to a balcony and fire a double-barreled shotgun into the air.  WRONG: Likely tactical error abandoning a safer ensconced defensive position, misuse of limited ammunition supply, endangers others, and probably an unlawful discharge. Continue reading

Vendor Spotlight: 44MAG.COM

Even robust Glock magazines should be considered consumables.

It seems that magazines are always on the national stage when it comes to the debate on gun control legislation, and there are always forces focused on restricting “standard” capacity magazines to some arbitrary number in the name of public safety. It is not my intention to turn MSW into a political forum, so let me just point out that in an autoloading pistol, the magazine is a critical component. Without a magazine, our fancy modern service pistol is nothing more than a sophisticated single shot. Continue reading

Mini Review: Vertx Phantom Ops Airflow pants

I was lucky to receive the other day a pair of the new Vertx Phantom Ops Airflow pants.  If you don’t know who Vertx is, well then you’ve been asleep behind the wheel of the tactical fashion industry.  Vertx (from their website) “is the tactical brand of Fechheimer, owned by Berkshire Hathaway, Inc and makers of Flying Cross military and law enforcement uniforms.”  I also heard the name Arc’Teryx mentioned at SHOT one year as having input into the design (haven’t got confirmation yet..). Continue reading

AAR: Mike Pannone Patrol Vehicle/Rapid Trauma Management

If you work around vehicles and carry a gun for a living, you should have a plan for how to function around your vehicle with that gun. If you carry a gun for a living, holes may possibly appear where you don’t want them, and you should have a plan for how to address those. Mike Pannone (CTT Solutions) offers a single class – Patrol Vehicle/Rapid Trauma Management –  which addresses these contingencies, and you should plan to get to it if you fit the above description. Continue reading

Surefire P3X Fury

The Surefire P3X Fury makes 1000 lumens for over 2 hours. Good to have on hand in case you don’t have access to a tanning booth. Photo from Surefire.

It doesn’t seem long ago that the 500 lumen output of the SureFire 10X Dominator was more light than you would ever need. The Dominator was big, bulky, but delivered a retina searing amount of light. With the advancement in LED technology, we now live in the golden age of small, bright, and efficient handheld and weapon lights. A few of my coworkers have recently purchased Surefire’s new P3X Fury. A conveniently sized light for patrol operations, this little beast is powered by 3 DL123A lithium batteries that cost a fraction of what they used to back in the 1990s when I was still carrying my 6P that cranked out an amazing 60 lumens for almost an hour. In contrast, the P3X generates nearly 17 times more light for more than twice the time (1000 lumens for over two hours). While a bit big for daily carry, for those on the job it may be just the perfect searching tool. When’s the last time you were in the field and asked yourself, “Boy I wish my flashlight wasn’t so bright”?

SOURCE: Surefire, LLC

LaserMax LM1141P Streamlight TLR-1 Test Results

Robar/10-8/MSW Glock with Streamlight TLR-1HL WML, Lasermax Guiderod Laser and MDFA Kydex Carry Gear

In a previous article I revisited my Robar/10-8/MSW Glock. At that time I had installed a LaserMax LM1141P Guide Rod Laser and a Streamlight TLR-1 WML. Since that time I have fired approximately 1500 rounds with them installed. The Laser came from the factory shooting POA/POI and has had absolutely no issues. I find that I sometimes activate the Laser when my trigger finger is in register on the frame of the pistol, before I intend too however. My fault not the Laser’s.

I really like the fact that the LaserMax is internal. This means your holsters will all fit, you won’t block the Laser with your hand or finger when gripping the pistol, and the sight/barrel offset is minimized with the system. Continue reading

Glock Pistols and the Grip Pressure Conundrum

For the early part of my on again/off again relationship with the Glock pistol, I had fits that I could shoot those little bitty, caliber and half sized groups at seven yards with repeatable boredom.  The problem I experienced, along with many others it seems, is that the group was consistently to the left of point of aim.  I am a right handed shooter.

I started becoming a serious student of the Glock seven or eight years ago due to work.  I fought it, aimed to the right for qualifications, and drifted sights as a solution.  The most frustrating thing is that when ball and dummy drills are introduced, no movement would be observed in the front sight.  It drove me crazy.

Then about six or so years ago, I was helping out with a cadet class at the state police academy when I observed the same thing with a group of cadets.  Right handed shooters were grouping left, and left handed shooters were grouping to the right with no visual clues during ball and dummy drills.

I went home and began to isolate parts of the shooting sequence to see if I could not figure it out.  Eventually, holding the gun with only pressure on the front strap and back, I began to hit point of aim/point of impact.  Eventually, I found out that I could death grip the gun as hard as I wanted as long as I only placed grip pressure squarely on axis of the front strap to the back strap with no side loading.

Some people have called the problem “Glock milking”, or simply milking the grip on a Glock with the strong hand.  I don’t believe the terminology is quite right as milking will manifest itself in some sight movement during ball and dummy drills.  This is not the case with introducing side load into the strong hand of the pistol.

Some folks have successfully countered the issue with stronger pressure on the support hand of the pistol.  It does seem to be hit and miss, however.

All I try to do is this.  With the strong hand, I place a moderate amount of grip on the pistol to support it out in front of me.   The support hand fills in the gaps and provides 360 degree pressure on the gun.  I put just enough pressure front to back that a magazine of shooting will leave a checkering imprint on the meat of my my palm under the thumb.  I also found that in placing pressure front strap to back strap it gives me extra lock out on the strong side wrist, stabilizing the gun shot to shot for faster sight return.

 

First Look: MDFA Kydex Holsters

Here are a couple holsters made by our very own MSW contributor Bob Henckel of MDFA.

Our loyal readers will recognize the name Bob Henckel as one of our regular contributors here at MSW. Bob owns and operates the Maine Defensive Firearms Academy and has recently reincarnated his Kydex holster operations. I was happy to discover this, as I’m always on the lookout for intelligently designed, functional kydex holsters. MDFA makes each holster to order, and the customer can select from over 50 colors and/or patterns available. The holsters are formed from .080″ Kydex, and can be had with 1.5″ or 1.75″ interchangeable belt loops. I chose two different rigs to try out: an IWB and OWB rig. The fit and finish are excellent, and every edge is hand finished. I’ll be carrying both over the next few weeks and will report back with my impressions. MDFA is still working on adding the holsters to the website, but you can order directly through them by hitting them through the contact portion of their site. Continue reading