Robar to the Glock Rescue

Robar grip work, 10-8 sights and mag base pad, slide work done by Mars Armament. Axe is an RMJ Shrike

It would be safe to say that the Glock as a pistol is almost, or dare I say as big an “icon” as the 1911. Glocks are being used by law enforcement and military personnel all over the world as well as being one of the best selling pistol manufacturers in the US. A good majority of gun owners, especially those who frequent shooting courses or instruction, all seem to own at least one Glock. With its popularity comes an exploding aftermarket with an endless list of companies making parts or modifying/machining the guns themselves. Some are worthy of mention and many are hacks with a hot piece of metal deforming the frames almost to the point of failure on unsuspecting owners looking to emulate the professionals for a fraction of the cost. I personally had a Glock stippled by a friend, and while not a hack job by any means I found the texture too aggressive and didn’t quite know how remedy it without just buying another frame. This is the point where Robar comes in. Continue reading

Robar NP3 AR15 Bolt Carrier Group

If you have more than a couple rounds down the barrel of the AR15 platform, you should know the system works but isn’t necessarily the cleanest. For anyone who actually shoots their gun instead of keeping it clean and pretty, the cleaning of the bolt carrier group in particular is always a fan favorite. Your choices are to soak it in solvent of some type of spend a good amount of time with a scraper of some type trying to break through the layer of fossilized carbon built up around the gas rings on the bolt. This is where aftermarket finishes and treatments have come into play in recent years in an effort to battle the carbon buildup. I have never been a fan of the flashy silver bolt carriers shining through the ejection port of a AR. I made a habit of writing them off as flash as my AR’s had always run just fine without them. Continue reading

When .22 splits aren’t fast enough……..

Recently, I was evaluating a HK VP9 that was done up by Grayguns, Inc.  I was shooting string after string on the timer.  I noticed that somewhere south of .22 splits on multi-shot strings, my accuracy fell apart.  I dismissed the VP9 as being inferior, due to the stock box P320 Carry giving me nice little piles of bullet holes at .16-.18 splits. Continue reading

Buy Once, Cry Once

I seem to keep learning the same lesson, over and over again.  Buy once, cry once.  The lower light is a Streamlight 600 lumen.  I picked it up at a bargain of $50.  I liked it a lot, and at the time my Surefire’s were all 200 lumen.  After a little bit of T&E, I mounted it on my issued HK416D.  I trained and used it at work for about a year without issue. Continue reading

SHOT Show mini reviews

Although I did not get to venture through the halls of splendor and witness the new hotness of every gun, gear and gadget, I did have the opportunity to look at a few items that piqued my interest.

I like clever and ingenious.  When someone looks at the mousetrap and says “I can do it better” that excites me.  I had the pleasure to sit down with some of these designers and take the opportunity to learn more about their nifty new thing.

First off, the Leupold D-EVO (Dual-Enhanced View Optic) http://www.leupold.com/tactical/scopes/d-evo

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Aimpoint Mounting Locations

Cantilever mounts allow Red Dot Optics to be mounted far enough forward so that a magnifier can be mounted with proper eye relief.

A few weeks ago, a reader emailed to ask for an article regarding preferred Aimpoint mounting locations on carbines. I have always done what just seemed right to me and had never put much thought into it. But apparently there was some method behind my madness, so here are my thoughts on the topic. Note that much of this is based on personal preference, so you may want to adjust to your needs.

The first point of consideration is whether I am mounting a full size Comp M68 or a Micro. The Micro is an excellent evolution of the sight and offers outstanding battery life, durability, in a lighter and more compact package than the M68. However, the viewing window is indeed smaller which, to me, changes some things as to how my eye picks up the dot when I mount the rifle.

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The Beretta 92G is BACK!!!!!!!

Photo courtesy Wilson Combat.

Beretta is bringing back in my opinion the best Model 92 pistol they ever made………the 92G series.

In an announcement on their Facebook page on November 4, 2014, Beretta announced that they were bringing back a couple of “classic” 92 series pistols.  One of these pistols is the 92G.  The 92G is for all purposes the same reliable, accurate service pistol that the military M9 is.  With the major exception that the decocker/safety is a decocker only.  I find this very important and believe this is the gun that the military should have bought.  The major detractor of the “decocker/safety” is the ability to inadvertently put the weapon on safe anytime you manipulate the slide.  For those living in a cave who have not shot the Beretta, this can lead to turning the gun into a non-functioning paper weight.  I’ve seen shooters over the years, and in some cases experienced shooters, accidentally push the safety/decocker down, and then pull the trigger two or three times before they realize what they have done and fix it.  Some instructors/schools have come up with doctrine to train around the decocker safety to keep this from happening, but to me the 92G is a much better deal.  The decocker on the 92G is the same as on its M9/92FS sibling, it is just spring loaded to the fire position.

BUT WAIT, THERE IS MORE!!!!!  The picture above is credited to Wilson Combat’s website.  It is a collaboration between Wilson Combat and Beretta.  It is a special run of Beretta 92G Brigadier pistols.

For more information, check out Beretta and Wilson Combat.

Distance, Sight Choices, and Some Random Thoughts.

Here of late, I have been involved with some interesting conversations on active shooter problem solving.  I will acknowledge up front that this thought process is somewhat flawed, and borderlines on the academic.  I will also acknowledge that I don’t have all the active shooter answers.  The answer I think we all can agree upon is the fact that good guys with guns is the answer to the active shooter/mass homicide problem. Continue reading

IRON SIGHT MYTHS, MISCONCEPTIONS, AND STUFF, PART 3: Fiber Optic Sights

In the interests of full disclaimer, I did hit this topic earlier this year in a post about the “fragile fiber optic front sight,” but this iron sight series seems to be a good place to stick all the ideas together under one mantle. It seems that I am constantly fielding the same questions about fiber optic sights, so let’s talk about some of the myths and misconceptions surrounding them. Continue reading

Product Review: Diamondhead USA

I was recently introduced to the product line of Diamondhead USA by a teammate. I was really drawn to the VRS-T rail so I decided to set up one of my older 14.5” Colt uppers with a 13.5″ model and try it out. The rebuild also included their T-Brake and Diamondhead folding sight set. I was initially drawn to the VRS-T rail due to its triangular shape, which reminded me of my old M16A1. The rail is pretty slim and the scalloped cuts on the sides give a very comfortable and secure grip without being too aggressive to hands or gloves. The T-Brake was added at their suggestion. I’m not normally a muzzle brake or compensator fan but, I figured there was no harm in giving it a try. Installation of the rail was pretty straight forward although it does require a bit of skill and planning to do it yourself. The rail mounts to a proprietary barrel nut and also requires removal of the delta ring. Depending on length, you may also need a low profile gas block or cutting of your front sight base. The T-Brake installed easily and comes pre-drilled for pinning if that is needed for your situation. It is long enough that it will bring a 14.5” barrel over 16”. The profile is triangular and blends nicely with the VRS-T rail, making it aesthetically pleasing, if you are concerned by that kind of stuff. Continue reading

Practically Tactical

I had a fellow in a class back in the spring who showed up in head to toe multicam.  He wore a shemagh, a plate carrier, Oakley gloves, and Salomon boots.  He carried a state of the art LWRCi rifle, complete with BAD lever, 45 degree sights, EoTech and magnifier.

He had a very narrow stance, and when he fired more than a couple shots in a string, he would begin to rock back throwing his shots out of the 3×5 card at seven yards during rapid strings. Continue reading