About Hilton Yam

Hilton Yam is the founder of 10-8 Performance, LLC. He is a full time law enforcement officer in Florida with extensive experience working robbery and violent fugitives. He is currently assigned to firearms training and SWAT. He is a team leader as well as the lead instructor for his team, responsible for providing training in firearms, CQB, rappelling, defensive tactics, and team tactics. Hilton is also responsible for RDT&E of equipment. He has carried a 1911 extensively on duty, and has spent a great deal of time examining what makes the guns succeed and fail.

The Long Slide Glock in Service Use

This past week a good buddy and I discussed the merits of choosing a Glock 17 or 34 for LE special team use. The long slide Glock 34 (9mm) and 35 (.40), initially introduced as competition pistols, have gotten some traction as service pistols. The M&P 9L (now discontinued), M&P Pro, and Glock 41 (.45) are other long slide versions of existing service sized pistols which come to mind. Continue reading

Shooting On The Move, a Trainer’s Perspective

I was once asked by a student, “Why don’t we train to shoot on the move?” I replied, “We need people to be able to shoot while stationary before we can expect to combine moving and shooting.” That is an oversimplified overview, but hits the crux of the matter. Our previous article hit the basics of the ideas surrounding shooting and moving, and today I wanted to offer a counterpoint focused primarily on the training considerations. Continue reading

1980′s Throwback for the 1911

In yesterday’s post, I promised to discuss the holster and magazine in the photograph. For starters, the knife was an easy one to ID – a classic Gerber Mark II in factory black finish. That knife is probably one of my favorite all time knives, though a dagger design with a smooth double guard handle is impractical for most applications. Continue reading

Back to the 80′s, 1911 Style

For last week’s Throwback Thursday post on my 10-8 Performance Instagram page,  I posted the above photo of a 1911 build I did back in 2001, along with a challenge to identify the holster rig, knife, and magazine. In a depressing turn of events which highlights a certain lack of attention span in social media, no one was able to ID the mag or holster. Let’s see if MSW readers can do any better. The answers will be featured in tomorrow’s article. Continue reading

Slow is smooth and smooth is fast. Well, not quite.

One of the most overheard phrases in firearms training is the old adage of “slow is smooth and smooth is fast.” In my career as a trainer and shooter, I seem to recall it most often told to me by people who were slow and maybe smooth and honestly had little business telling me what actually was fast. Words have powerful meaning, and as an instructor, it is important for us to use the correct ones when trying to impart skills and knowledge to our students. Continue reading

IRON SIGHT MYTHS, MISCONCEPTIONS, AND STUFF, PART 3: Fiber Optic Sights

In the interests of full disclaimer, I did hit this topic earlier this year in a post about the “fragile fiber optic front sight,” but this iron sight series seems to be a good place to stick all the ideas together under one mantle. It seems that I am constantly fielding the same questions about fiber optic sights, so let’s talk about some of the myths and misconceptions surrounding them. Continue reading

Confessions of a Backpackaholic

It seems that I am on a perpetual search for the perfect daypack. Ever since Eagle popularized the “3 Day Pack” size, I have tried every variation of that size category in search for the ideal daily use backpack. I function in an urban environment, so what I really use the pack for is humping my daily collection of personal gear, and not trekking across the wilderness for miles on end. Continue reading

Iron Sight Myths, Misconceptions, and Stuff, Part 1: Three Dot Sights

At some horrible, fateful point in the late 80′s or so, the 3 dot sight system assumed the throne of its seemingly never-ending reign of terror. Yes, I hate 3 dot sights, and so should you.

The basic rationale behind the 3 dot sight system is that it speeds up sight alignment by allowing you to theoretically line up the dots and fire. It’s not so simple, and let’s look at some of the issues.

Do I line up the top plane of the sights or the 3 dots when I aim? You NEVER ever ever ever ever ever line up the 3 dots to aim. Ever. Well maybe that’s a bit broad, but novice shooters should just reread that and stick with it. The 3 dots serve only to theoretically speed sight acquisition, but there is no guarantee that the 3 dots are actually in a correct line relative to your point of impact, so there is no reason to use them in such a manner. The most accurate and correct work is always to be done with the top plane of the sights. The only real exception is if you are in pitch darkness and the only elements you see are your 3 glowing tritium dots. However, that is fodder for a different article so don’t steal my thunder for part 27 of this series.

Those 3 dots are so easy to see and line up! When the gun is clean and you are dry firing in a relaxed manner in perfect lighting, sure. Once you start shooting, the front sight – where your attention should be – starts to get dirty from muzzle blast and the nice clean rear dots really jump out at your eye instead. When white outlined tritium dots age, it is easy to end up with three dots that are different colors and shapes thanks to paint outlines fading and chipping. Your eye wants a single area of focus, not three different ones.

Under stress you can line up the dots wrong by putting your front sight outside the two rear dots. Well I suppose that could happen, but go try it right now and look how wildly wrong the pistol needs to be aligned to have that happen. A little more dry fire time is in order if this happens to you regularly.

You’ll notice that the pistol in the photo above has the two rear dots blacked out with magic marker. It is a cheap fix, and one that I recommend be done on every factory sight set. This simple trick was passed on to me years ago by friend and mentor Ken Hackathorn, a guy who has forgotten more about handgunning than most will ever know. Marker does rub off easily, but the advantage of using marker instead of paint is that the rear tritium inserts will glow through the ink if you still want to use the tritium. Try this little trick and you may find that your front sight suddenly jumps out at your eye when you shoot.

HK VP9, Range Time Impressions

I finally managed to squeeze in a serious range session with my new HK VP9. I shot the gun completely stock with the exception of blacking out the two dots on the rear sight with a black marker. Holster rig was a pair of Comptac P30 mag pouches and their P30 paddle holster with the retention backed out a bit. It worked out well enough in a pinch, but a different holster is forthcoming. Continue reading

Carrying in PT Gear

Much like Sisyphus, the poor bastard in Greek mythology who was doomed to forever push a rock uphill and have it roll back down, Tim and I seem to repeat the same conversation every few months. It usually goes like this:

Me: Man, I wish there was a better way to carry while I was in PT gear.

Tim: Yeah, no real convenient way. Also it is hard to PT with the gun on anyway, and you risk having it fall out or hurting you if you roll on it or something.

Me: No, I meant while wearing PT gear, like on the way home after the workout, not during PT.

Tim: Oh. Continue reading

The History of the 10-8 1911 Trigger

 

From front to back: Trigger01, Trigger02, Trigger03

A recent discussion on Facebook about the 1911 industry and trigger designs reminded me that it would probably be of interest to our readers to go over the history of the 10-8 1911 triggers.

Before I delve into 10-8 triggers, a quick word on 1911 triggers is in order. Back in the early 1980′s, the dawn of the 1911 aftermarket part industry as we know it, there were just a few options for a custom trigger in your gun, and it usually was a Videki, King’s Gunworks, or a Wilson. Some other ones might have been around, but they slip my mind right now. It wasn’t like it is now, where you have a whole Brownells sub catalog filled with only 1911 parts. Continue reading