About Jerry Jones

Jerry Jones has been a Sheriff's Deputy in Kentucky since 1996. Jerry is currently assigned as a patrol deputy, firearms instructor and senior operator/training supervisor with a multi jurisdictional tactical team. Jerry is Kentucky POST certified to teach firearms, SWAT, and sniper operations and deployment at the Academy level. Jerry is also the President/CEO of Operation Specific Training and the Law Enforcement Representative for Apex Tactical Specialties.

Should I suppress for home defense?


Sorry folks, the park is closed….Moose out front should have told you“  John Candy-“National Lampoons Vacation”.

The words of John Candy’s character kind of sum up my advice on the most of the “should I do XYZ for my home defense gun”.  The fact is I only give advice on suppressors for home defense because there are thousands of variables.  I can’t say with any kind of authority what might be right for your situation.  Using suppressors doesn’t seem to be a one sized fits all.  Juries and prosecutors might view a suppressed rifle in a deadly force incident one way in one location, and another way some place else.  What I can do is give some things to think about, and the individual can decide for themselves based upon their situation and their needs. Continue reading

Glock Pistols and the Grip Pressure Conundrum

For the early part of my on again/off again relationship with the Glock pistol, I had fits that I could shoot those little bitty, caliber and half sized groups at seven yards with repeatable boredom.  The problem I experienced, along with many others it seems, is that the group was consistently to the left of point of aim.  I am a right handed shooter.

I started becoming a serious student of the Glock seven or eight years ago due to work.  I fought it, aimed to the right for qualifications, and drifted sights as a solution.  The most frustrating thing is that when ball and dummy drills are introduced, no movement would be observed in the front sight.  It drove me crazy.

Then about six or so years ago, I was helping out with a cadet class at the state police academy when I observed the same thing with a group of cadets.  Right handed shooters were grouping left, and left handed shooters were grouping to the right with no visual clues during ball and dummy drills.

I went home and began to isolate parts of the shooting sequence to see if I could not figure it out.  Eventually, holding the gun with only pressure on the front strap and back, I began to hit point of aim/point of impact.  Eventually, I found out that I could death grip the gun as hard as I wanted as long as I only placed grip pressure squarely on axis of the front strap to the back strap with no side loading.

Some people have called the problem “Glock milking”, or simply milking the grip on a Glock with the strong hand.  I don’t believe the terminology is quite right as milking will manifest itself in some sight movement during ball and dummy drills.  This is not the case with introducing side load into the strong hand of the pistol.

Some folks have successfully countered the issue with stronger pressure on the support hand of the pistol.  It does seem to be hit and miss, however.

All I try to do is this.  With the strong hand, I place a moderate amount of grip on the pistol to support it out in front of me.   The support hand fills in the gaps and provides 360 degree pressure on the gun.  I put just enough pressure front to back that a magazine of shooting will leave a checkering imprint on the meat of my my palm under the thumb.  I also found that in placing pressure front strap to back strap it gives me extra lock out on the strong side wrist, stabilizing the gun shot to shot for faster sight return.

 

Practice with Back Up Guns

I think that most all police officers, and some armed citizens to a point, are carrying back up guns as a norm.  Back in the day, most carried Walther PPK’s and Smith and Wesson J-frames as a back up gun.  When the Glock 26/27 debuted, the world was set on its ear.  The compatibility alone made sense for the agencies that issued the G17/22 to add the “baby” Glocks as back ups. Continue reading

3000 Rounds Later- The Smith and Wesson VTAC 2

A couple of years ago, I purchased a Smith and Wesson VTAC  M&P15 from a coworker.  It became one of my favorite rifles pretty quickly. The rifle was spec’d by Kyle Lamb, head dude in charge over at Viking Tactics and is street ready.

A few months ago, I walked into my local gun shop and they had a VTAC 2 in stock.  I handled the rifle, and after some internal debate, I became the new owner of the VTAC 2. Continue reading

Sight Radius- What role does it really play in a defensive pistol?

Recently, I’ve been shooting some drills from concealment with various pistols from the Glock 9mm family.  My thinking over the years on a defensive pistol is that it should be one that fits a couple of simple criteria: a pistol that is reliable, and one that you’ll carry every day.  For some, a Ruger LCP fits the bill.  A Ruger in the pocket always beats a custom M1911 in the car when it comes down to needing it now. However, I’ve always advocated carrying the most gun that you can comfortably carry. Some will say there is an “average” gun fight (IE 1-3 feet, 1-3 Seconds, 1-3 rounds fired).  I feel that there is no such thing as “average” and if I can perform these tasks at 25 yards at speed, the close in stuff is a chip shot.  However, merely banging away at contact distance doesn’t equate to hitting stuff at distance if it becomes a lifesaving requirement.  But, that is a conversation for another day. Continue reading

The Police Patrol Rifle-K.I.S.S

At a recent LE patrol rifle qualification, I stood behind the line, and observed something I guess I’ve known for a while now.  The basic patrol officer hangs way too much crap on their patrol rifles, and most of the time, all this stuff they hang on it, doesn’t equate to better accuracy down range.

Hear what I am saying prior to sharpening those pitchforks, and lighting the torches.

Patrol is the backbone of policing in the United States.  They are the true first responders.  No call is the same, no situation is the same.  They have to be prepared for just about everything at any time.  I get that.   And things such as a good sling, a white light, and a QUALITY Red Dot sight are helpful. Continue reading

The FNH SCAR- 16

In late 2004, FN Herstal won the contract from the United States Special Operations Command for a new, modular, and adaptable rifle system. The FNH entry was called the Special Operations Forces Combat Assault Rifle (SCAR). The new rifle system offering was rumored to be slated for several different calibers, including 6.8 SPC. To date, the FNH SCAR is only available in factory form in 5.56x45mm and 7.62x51mm. The FNH SCAR saw service with the United States Special Operations Command (SOCOM) in the two variants, the SCAR MK16 (5.56), commonly referred to as the SCAR-L for Light, and the MK17 (7.62), commonly referred to as the SCAR-H for Heavy. In 2010, SOCOM announced that it was cancelling the MK16 program. The initial claim was that the MK16 did not do anything better than the current M4 offerings.  To my knowledge, a couple of units still field the 5.56 SCAR-L in the 10.5 inch CQC variant. The SCAR family of rifles operate off of a short stroke piston system. The SCAR family of rifles are also completely ambidextrous, a bonus for left handed shooters who often are at the whim of right hand designs. Continue reading

The Modified Glock

Glocks tend to run great out of the box.  They are reliable, and accurate.  I have a friend who shoots a lot of 3 gun and IDPA with a completely stock Glock 17 with the plastic sights, and does it well.  Some folks like to simply change out of the plastic “filler” sights that come stock, for aftermarket sights such as 10-8′s.

I like my Glocks a bit more modified.  Above is a brand new Gen4 G19 that is a recent acquisition.  The gun shot great out of the box, but there are changes that I like to make for my own benefit. Continue reading

Safariland QLS Hits The Two Year Mark- Review

A couple of years ago, I really wanted to get my holster away from my body a bit more, particularly when wearing a heavy winter coat.  I found that a lot of times, my front sight would snag on the coat pocket on the way up.

So, I did my research and chose to go with the Safariland Quick Locking System versus a simple stand off.  At the time, I didn’t realize how beneficial that would be.

I do not have a take home car due to not living in the county that I work, so I have a 10 minute commute to work each day.  When I purchased my new Toyota 4Runner, I noticed that the holster was wearing on the leather.  So, I started taking the holster and pistol off when in my own vehicle.  Thus it has saved on the wear and tear on the leather.  Extra added bonus, to say the least.

Some of my coworkers have been hesitant about the connection systems, but I have had zero problems from it.  One of the neat features is that you can have multiple attach points and use the same holster in many functions, IE a belt attachment, a drop leg attachment, etc.

I have found this piece of gear to be very durable.  The locking mechanism is as strong two years later, as it was the first day I attached it to this holster.  I’ve encountered zero problems with it, and have nothing but praise for the system in the context I use it.

Check it out at www.safariland.com.

Hogue S&W Centennial and Polymer Bodyguard Rubber TAMER™ Grips

At the NRA Show, Pat Hogue, of Hogue Inc.,  dropped by the Apex Tactical/OpSpec Training Booth to chat.  Pat noticed Scott Folk’s Smith and Wesson 342 sitting in the cabinet sporting the Hogue pink rubber grips.  Pat went over to his booth and returned with his new Hogue S&W Centennial and Polymer Bodyguard Rubber TAMER™ Grips.  Pat installed the grips and showed the latest features.  It was pretty ingenious.

Finding and deciding on the grips for a Smith and Wesson J Frame isn’t always easy.  Hogue has always been a good choice, and at times has been OEM for Smith and Wesson.  The new TAMER grips improved on Hogue’s long winning design in a few areas.  The first, and most noticeable was the molded plastic “butt cap” that was added to bottom portion of the grips.  The first thing that this allows for is a smooth, snag free draw that is not being hampered by the rubber grabbing on a cover garment.

The next thing was the ability to take a round from the gun when you unload (an inert round in this case as we were inside the show), and remove the grips without other tools.  Pretty slick.

The rest of the attributes the new grips bring to the table carry over from the classic Hogue design.  While a little large for ankle concealment, this style Hogue makes shooting hotter +P loadings a lot more fun.  Some of the small bikini grips are just no fun after the first 15 rounds or so.

Lastly, when buying from Hogue, you’re buying from a family company that stands behind their product.  There is peace of mind in that alone.

More information can be found at www.getgrip.com.